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Digitising the Library’s Medieval Manuscripts

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15/05/2014

By | Digital Developments, Early Medicine

This month the Wellcome Library will begin digitising its entire collection of pre-1500 Western European manuscripts. The digitised manuscripts, about 300 items in total, will be freely accessible through the Library catalogue and will become available steadily through the course of the project.

MS. 446 (late 15th-century alchemical manuscript in French and Latin), fos 27v.–28r. Wellcome Image no. L0031726 .

MS. 446 (late 15th-century alchemical manuscript in French and Latin), fos 27v.–28r. Wellcome Image no. L0031726 .

Our Western manuscripts are known to medievalists across the world, and cover a wide range of subjects, from learned medicine and surgery to magic, alchemy, botany, astrology and more. They also reflect a range of manuscript formats, from conventional bound codices to folding almanacs and scrolls. Texts are written in Latin, Greek, English, German, French, Dutch and several other languages, and many manuscripts are illustrated with drawings, diagrams, illuminated initials or even marginal grotesques.

The manuscripts will be photographed in batches of 20 items, with each batch taken out of circulation for 8 weeks, during which time items will be unavailable for consultation in the Rare Materials Room. Full information about batches and timings can be found on the Library website. Photography will be completed at the end of October 2015.

We hope that this project will both facilitate further research on well-known manuscripts, like the ‘Wellcome Apocalypse’ (ms. 49) and the ‘Physician’s Handbook’ (ms. 8004), and encourage discovery of lesser-known items. We are very keen for the digitised content to be viewed not just by medievalists, but also by non-specialists who are interested in these fascinating objects. We wish to attract audiences in many different parts of the world, and to enable study of our manuscripts alongside items in other library collections.

Many of the Library’s medieval manuscripts were purchased during Sir Henry Wellcome’s lifetime, and we are delighted to be producing a digital collection that represents some of the formative holdings of the Library alongside subsequent acquisitions. We have a world-class collection of manuscripts relating to medicine, science and many other aspects of medieval culture, and we intend through digitisation to share it as widely as possible.

Author: Dr Elma Brenner is Specialist, Medieval and Early Modern Medicine at the Wellcome Library.

Elma Brenner

Elma Brenner

Dr Elma Brenner is the Wellcome Library’s subject specialist in medieval and early modern medicine. Her research examines the medical and religious culture of medieval France and England, especially the region of Normandy. She is also interested in the materiality of early books and manuscripts, and the digital humanities. For her publications, see http://www.unicaen.fr/crahm/spip.php?article557&lang=fr. She can be found on Twitter @elmabrenner.

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4 comments on Digitising the Library’s Medieval Manuscripts
  • Roger Pearse

    26/05/2014

    Excellent news! I hope the results will be downloadable in PDF also. It’s really a pain trying to skim through a codex miscellanaeus looking for anything of interest if you have to use a cumbersome “viewer”.

    Reply

    • Lalita

      27/05/2014

      Hello Roger, anything digitised in the Wellcome Library’s ‘viewer’ can be downloaded as a pdf document using the download link at the bottom left of the ‘viewer’. This will include the medieval material when it is ready.

      Lalita
      Wellcome Library

      Reply

  • Nick Dunlavey

    28/05/2014

    Is this digitisation just as images, or transcription into digital text using something like transScriptorium?

    Reply

    • Lalita

      28/05/2014

      Hi Nick, it will be as images, largely because of the scale of the project (around 300 items), but we may do more with individual items in the future.

      Reply

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