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Tag: Early Sex and Reproduction

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  • Censorship on medieval manuscript page.

    Censorship of medieval English recipes

    21/04/2017

    A late medieval manuscript in the Wellcome Library contains intriguing marks of censorship. MS. 406 is a collection of Middle English texts and recipes produced in the 15th and early 16th centuries. The recipes are from the ‘Practica phisicalia’ composed… Continue reading

  • Anatomical image, 1573.

    The Vesalius Census: the reception history of the ‘Fabrica’ from 1543 to 2016

    22/02/2017

    The next seminar in the 2016–17 History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series takes place on Tuesday 28 February. Speaker: Dr Dániel Margócsy (University of Cambridge) From its very beginnings, Andreas Vesalius’ ‘De humani corporis fabrica’ of 1543, this most fabulous of anatomy atlases,… Continue reading

  • Image of Aristotle and hairy woman.

    ‘Aristotle”s bestselling sex manual

    09/12/2016

    Sex, childbirth and reproductive health were topics of considerable interest to people in early modern England. The Wellcome Library has a substantial collection of different editions of a hugely popular printed work addressing these issues in 17th- and 18th-century England,… Continue reading

  • Image from midwifery book.

    Images on the move in Mauriceau’s ‘The diseases of women’

    08/11/2016

    Looking through copies of ‘The diseases of women with child and in child-bed’, the English translation of the seminal work on midwifery by François Mauriceau (1637–1709) first published in French in 1668, I noticed something distinctive. While in some editions… Continue reading

  • Woodcut of man suffering from pox.

    Early medicine: new on the shelves

    07/11/2016

    This post marks the first of a series of quarterly roundups of new publications of interest to researchers of early medicine that have recently been added to the shelves of the Wellcome Library. The bulletin will highlight monographs and collections… Continue reading

  • Image of childbirth in early printed book

    Bawling babies and their baths in early modern England

    21/06/2016

    Galenic and Hippocratic medical traditions did not see all bodies as the same. Indeed, recent work by Hannah Newton has shown that early modern physicians treated and perceived children as ‘physiologically distinct’ from adults. Children, including infants, were moist, warm… Continue reading

  • Shakespeare’s twins

    25/04/2016

    Why was Shakespeare so interested in twins? Did they have a special meaning for his audience? Dr Daisy Garofalo investigates in the second of our Shakespeare themed posts. Shakespeare features twin characters in two of his comedies, The Comedy of… Continue reading

  • Disease woman image

    The ‘disease woman’ of the Wellcome Apocalypse

    30/12/2015

    By the middle of the 15th century, women’s healthcare had begun to shift from a field dominated by women to one monitored and controlled by men. Following the classical Aristotelian schema, the female body was perceived as biologically inferior, intrinsically… Continue reading

  • Image from birth scroll

    Wellcome MS. 632: heavenly protection during childbirth in late medieval England

    25/10/2015

    Wellcome MS. 632 may be the only surviving ‘birth girdle’ in England that was actually used during childbirth. This parchment roll survives as a rare artefact from a time when women, who could afford it, gave birth in well-furnished darkened… Continue reading

  • Image from 1513 midwifery book.

    Women’s medicine between script and print, c. 1450–1600

    21/10/2015

    The second seminar in the 2015–16 History of Pre-Modern Medicine Seminar Series takes place on Tuesday 27th October. Speaker: Dr Gabriella Zuccolin (University of Cambridge) Women’s medicine between script and print, c. 1450–1600 Abstract: By 1600 only a few gynaecological texts written in Latin… Continue reading