Tag: incunabula

Show Navigation
  • Woodcut from incunabulum.

    Incunabula and medicine: a report


    On Friday 20 May 2016, the Wellcome Library hosted a workshop (for the programme, see a previous post) that aimed to bring about new discussions on incunabula, the earliest printed books, and medicine. This was the first time that the… Continue reading

  • Wound man in 1495 printed book.

    Wound man Part 2: afterlives


    The remarkable manuscript image of the wound man did not die with the medieval medical world that created it, finding a rich afterlife in the Renaissance and beyond. With the adoption of new print technologies in the second half of… Continue reading

  • Astrological image from incunabulum.

    Incunabula and medicine: a workshop


    On Friday 20 May 2016 the Wellcome Library will host a one-day workshop on incunabula and medicine. This event will reflect broadly on the relationship between the earliest printed books and medicine. Topics will include: medical illustration in incunabula; the… Continue reading

  • Digitising our incunabula: final phase of the early European printed books project


    We’re nearing the end of our early European printed books digitisation project with ProQuest. After four years of digitisation, nearly 3.8 million images have been captured from 8,850 volumes published outside the UK before 1701. In the final phase of… Continue reading

  • Friends reunited: an incunabulum split between London and Glasgow


    Among its substantial collection of incunabula (books printed before the year 1501), the Wellcome Library holds six copies of Hortus sanitatis (Garden of Health), a richly illustrated botanical compendium in Latin, based on the German Gart der Gesundheit. The work… Continue reading

  • Hermitage and heritage: Augustinians in history


    Austen (the surname of one of England’s best-loved novelists) and Austin (the capital city of Texas) are both abbreviations of the name Augustine. That name became popular from Saint Augustine of Hippo, Father and Doctor of the Church (354-430), philosopher… Continue reading